Knowledge gaps found for non-drug therapy in peds ADHD

June 2, 2018

(HealthDay)—There are considerable gaps in knowledge relating to the effectiveness of non-pharmacologic treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in pediatric patients, according to a review published online May 30 in Pediatrics.

Adam P. Goode, D.P.T., Ph.D., from Duke University in Durham, N.C., and colleagues examined the of non-pharmacologic treatments for ADHD among individuals age 17 years and younger. Studies that compared any ADHD non-pharmacologic treatment strategy with placebo, pharmacologic, or another non-pharmacologic treatment were included. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate pooled estimates for comparisons with at least three similar studies.

Fifty-four studies of non-pharmacologic treatments were identified, including neurofeedback, cognitive training, , child or parent training, dietary omega fatty acid supplementation, and herbal and/or dietary approaches. The researchers found that there was no new guidance relating to the comparative effectiveness of non-pharmacologic treatments. In pooled results for , there were no significant effects for parent or teacher ratings of ADHD total symptoms.

"Despite wide use, there are significant gaps in knowledge regarding the effectiveness of ADHD non-pharmacologic treatments," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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Journal information: Pediatrics

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